September 2007

Pre-2008 Archived Articles

NTSB Wants Better ELTs in Aircraft

The FAA should require that all emergency locator transmitters in general aviation aircraft must be upgraded, the NTSB said (PDF) on Wednesday. The newer 406 MHz transmitters have significant advantages, the NTSB says, including longer range, better accuracy, and the ability to encode identification information, so rescuers know exactly what airplane is in distress. The safety board cites two accidents: In one airplane equipped with an older ELT, 16 hours elapsed before rescuers found the survivors, and when an airplane with a 406 MHz ELT crashed, the wreckage was located within an hour. The FAA should require an upgrade to the 406 MHz units before February 2009, when a change in satellite services will make the older units even less reliable, the NTSB says.

Pre-2008 Archived Articles

NTSB Wants Better ELTs in Aircraft

The FAA should require that all emergency locator transmitters in general aviation aircraft must be upgraded, the NTSB said (PDF) on Wednesday. The newer 406 MHz transmitters have significant advantages, the NTSB says, including longer range, better accuracy, and the ability to encode identification information, so rescuers know exactly what airplane is in distress. The safety board cites two accidents: In one airplane equipped with an older ELT, 16 hours elapsed before rescuers found the survivors, and when an airplane with a 406 MHz ELT crashed, the wreckage was located within an hour. The FAA should require an upgrade to the 406 MHz units before February 2009, when a change in satellite services will make the older units even less reliable, the NTSB says.

Pre-2008 Archived Articles

Palo Alto Airport – City Trying to Determine How to Manage It

Wednesday, September 19, 2007
City could take over airport within three years Long-term future of 100-acre Baylands facility up in the air
By Becky Trout
The Palo Alto (CA) Online

 

Like an airplane owner who doesn’t know how to fly, the City of Palo Alto has an airport but doesn’t know how to manage it. It’s left that to Santa Clara County for the last 40 years. Yet in three to 10 years, the city will have its hands on the controls of its 100-acre airport, an operation the county is ready to give up. What happens then is anyone’s guess.

Pre-2008 Archived Articles

Palo Alto Airport – City Trying to Determine How to Manage It

Wednesday, September 19, 2007
City could take over airport within three years Long-term future of 100-acre Baylands facility up in the air
By Becky Trout
The Palo Alto (CA) Online

 

Like an airplane owner who doesn’t know how to fly, the City of Palo Alto has an airport but doesn’t know how to manage it. It’s left that to Santa Clara County for the last 40 years. Yet in three to 10 years, the city will have its hands on the controls of its 100-acre airport, an operation the county is ready to give up. What happens then is anyone’s guess.

Pre-2008 Archived Articles

French Valley Airport – New Development Regulations in Review

Wednesday, September 19, 2007
Comment period begins on airport development
The San Diego (CA) Union-Tribune

MURRIETA – A 30-day public comment period begins Wednesday on findings related to proposed new regulations about development in and around the French Valley Airport. The comment period focuses on a declaration by the Riverside County Airport Land Use Commission that no negative impacts will be caused by adopting a new proposed Airport Compatibility Plan for the French Valley Airport.