March 2013

California Airports

Tehachapi City Council Ignores Hotel in Airport Safety Zone Issue

Tehachapi Airport2Tehachapi Airport Tehachapi City Council Denies Hotel Appeal – The Tehachapi City Council held a public hearing denying local airport hanger owner Kenneth Hetge his appeal to halt the construction of a new hotel in Capital Hills. The council made its decision at its Feb. 19 meeting despite hearing from nearly a dozen pilots who supported Hetge’s appeal, citing various incidents of aircraft crashes in other locations and other airport landing and take off related issues.

“I’ve been a pilot all my life,” said George Sandy, “I commend Mr. Hetge for doing his homework. He’s a staunch supporter of aviation.”

California Airports

Tehachapi City Council Ignores Hotel in Airport Safety Zone Issue

Tehachapi Airport2Tehachapi Airport Tehachapi City Council Denies Hotel Appeal – The Tehachapi City Council held a public hearing denying local airport hanger owner Kenneth Hetge his appeal to halt the construction of a new hotel in Capital Hills. The council made its decision at its Feb. 19 meeting despite hearing from nearly a dozen pilots who supported Hetge’s appeal, citing various incidents of aircraft crashes in other locations and other airport landing and take off related issues.

“I’ve been a pilot all my life,” said George Sandy, “I commend Mr. Hetge for doing his homework. He’s a staunch supporter of aviation.”

Aviation Regulation

FCC Floats New 121.5 MHz ELT Ban Proposal

fcc logoThe Federal Communications Commission has revived a plan to ban 121.5 MHz emergency locator transmitters (ELTs) in a proposal that could cost aircraft owners hundreds of millions of dollars.

In the Jan. 30 document, the FCC proposes to discontinue sales of the older-model ELTs and asks for input on whether to allow those already installed in aircraft to continue to be used. Prohibiting use of 121.5 MHz ELTs would force aircraft owners to discard perfectly functional units and replace them at a cost of $1,000 to $1,500 per airplane—regardless of what other tracking technology the pilot uses. AOPA urges pilots and aircraft owners to speak out on how a ban would affect them.

Aviation Regulation

FCC Floats New 121.5 MHz ELT Ban Proposal

fcc logoThe Federal Communications Commission has revived a plan to ban 121.5 MHz emergency locator transmitters (ELTs) in a proposal that could cost aircraft owners hundreds of millions of dollars.

In the Jan. 30 document, the FCC proposes to discontinue sales of the older-model ELTs and asks for input on whether to allow those already installed in aircraft to continue to be used. Prohibiting use of 121.5 MHz ELTs would force aircraft owners to discard perfectly functional units and replace them at a cost of $1,000 to $1,500 per airplane—regardless of what other tracking technology the pilot uses. AOPA urges pilots and aircraft owners to speak out on how a ban would affect them.