avweb logoA new federal budget plan released by the White House on Tuesday includes a proposal to “establish a surcharge for air traffic services of $100 per flight.” NBAA President Ed Bolen said similar proposals in the last three budgets were stopped when the aviation community mobilized and asked elected officials to oppose the fees. “There is bipartisan opposition to user fees on Capitol Hill,” Bolen said. NBAA will continue working with leaders in Congress, he said, “to support FAA funding and aviation system modernization without user fees for general aviation, so that our nation’s aviation system can remain the world’s largest, safest and most efficient.” General aviation already pays for its use of the aviation system through the fuel tax, Bolen added.

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The Obama Administration’s continuing attempts to raise taxes on business aircraft, reiterated in a White House press briefing, are short-sighted and threaten to suppress job creation in a fragile economy, AOPA said.

The general aviation industry and its supporters in Congress spoke out strongly against new indications that the administration may seek a tax increase on business aircraft operators in the form of changed depreciation rules for aviation assets.

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Really? Are there only 3,035 general aviators out there who are against paying a $100 per flight user fee? Click here to sign the petition. If you’re not already convinced, then please read on. Maybe you’ve been busy with work. Maybe you’ve been caught up in a family member getting… Read More

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As we reported to you the other day, as part of discussions between Members of Congress and the Administration on a potential solution to our nation’s deficit challenges, Members are still discussing the possibility of reinvigorating a greatly harmful “user fee” tax on our businesses and groups that depend on general aviation. 

New aviation user fees aren’t in the Obama administration’s budget, but they still may be packaged elsewhere, AOPA’s Lorraine Howerton told AVweb Thursday. Howerton is AOPA’s vice president of legislative affairs, and while she said AOPA’s efforts had created some breathing room, the country’s fiscal woes may become a serious influence on future funding decisions. As the budget deficit soars, legislators are under increasing pressure to shrink federal spending wherever possible. Currently, the general fund for the FAA is down 30 percent, said Howerton. She added that the decrease may translate into a greater draw on the Aviation Trust Fund, and that draw may in turn drive legislators to seek alternate forms of funding — potentially, user fees. There are other concerns.

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