Lake Tahoe

Aviation Interest

Tahoe Seaplane Splash-in – TRPA Board meeting on June 23

The threat to the future of seaplanes on Lake Tahoe is not fully gone yet. The TRPA Board meeting on June 23 will be the determining vote on the issue. Following that vote, assuming we prevail, we will, through the SPA Water Flying Directory, publicize the existing limitations as they apply to all boats (no wake zones, no more than 5 mph in Emerald Bay, no power boats in marked swimming zones) and encouraged continued best practices for both noise and invasive species threats to Lake Tahoe.

Aviation Interest

Tahoe Seaplane Splash-in – TRPA Board meeting on June 23

The threat to the future of seaplanes on Lake Tahoe is not fully gone yet. The TRPA Board meeting on June 23 will be the determining vote on the issue. Following that vote, assuming we prevail, we will, through the SPA Water Flying Directory, publicize the existing limitations as they apply to all boats (no wake zones, no more than 5 mph in Emerald Bay, no power boats in marked swimming zones) and encouraged continued best practices for both noise and invasive species threats to Lake Tahoe.

Airport Support

Lake Tahoe – Annual Seaplane Splash-in Threatened

Lake Tahoe Seaplane Pilots Confront Closure Threat, Face Financial Hurdles
Long a premier destination for seaplanes in the Western United States, local governing bodies threaten to severely restrict seaplane access to the largest alpine lake in the Western Hemisphere. Bisected by the California – Nevada border, Lake Tahoe, often called “The Jewel of the Sierra,” is 6200 feet above sea level, 24 miles long, 12 miles wide and the second deepest lake in North America.