faast(Flying into the mountains this winter?) Cold temperature altitude corrections at “Cold Temperature Restricted Airports”
Notice Number: NOTC5758

Cold Temperature Restricted Airports have now been designated in the United States National Airspace System. The list of airports, the segment of the approach requiring the altitude correction and operating procedures may be found in the Notice to Airmen Publication (NTAP) http://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/notices/ Part 4. Graphic Notices, Section 1. General. Cold Temperature Restricted Airports. The list will also be available as a PDF on the bottom of the FAA Digital Products, “Terminal Procedures Basic Search” page: http://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/flight_info/aeronav/digital_products/dtpp/search/

Read More

faastThe July/August 2014 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on Flying Companions. In this issue we look to provide a basic guide for friends and loved ones who join us in the air or might have an interest in doing so. In addition, you can learn about the current state of ADS-B and where it’s going in the future.

Read More

With the recent publicity about individuals being on the “Do Not Fly List” and receiving Flight Instruction, we want to remind CFIs that they have certain responsibilities to fulfill before instructing a non-US citizen. This notice is to remind Flight Instructors of their responsibilities under the Code of Federal Regulations to notify the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) when providing flight instruction to foreign pilots. 

Read More

The roundout in a small airplane is a slow, smooth transition from a normal approach attitude to a landing attitude, gradually rounding out the flightpath to one that is parallel with, and within a very few inches above, the runway.

Read More

FAA Updates Flight Training Regulations
In an effort to enhance safety, respond to changes in the aviation industry, and reduce unnecessary regulatory burdens, the FAA published a final rule which amends regulations on pilot, flight instructor, and pilot school certification.

Read More

During the landing roll, wheel barrowing can occur if you touch down on the main wheels and the nose wheel simultaneously while holding excessive speed, and then add forward pressure to the yoke. Wheel barrowing will not occur if the pilot maintains the correct speed, and touches down main wheels first, then gently lowers the nose wheel.

Read More

What is your proficiency when it comes to flying in today’s airspace? Weather minimums and clearance from clouds – is it that you should be 500′ above a cloud deck and 1000′ below? Or is it 500′ below and 1000′ above that are the minimums. Compton is Class G airspace. How many really know what that means to our flying here? At our membership meeting, Pat Carey, a member of the FAA’s FAAST Team and local pilot examiner (and maybe his sidekick Robin McCall) will give us a briefing on the FAA’s WINGS program.

Read More